Thursday, January 9, 2014

CVHS Program for Sunday, January 19, 2014, at 3 p.m.

SLAVERY IN NORTH AMERICA: 
ORIGIN, PRACTICE AND PRODUCTION OF CASH CROPS


          Civil War historian Murphy Wood will present  “Slavery in North America:  Origin, Practice,
and Production of Cash Crops” at the next meeting of the Chattahoochee Valley Historical Society on January 19. The quarterly meeting will be held at 3:00 pm ET at the Bradshaw Library in Valley, AL.
            Slavery first emerged in the western hemisphere during the colonial period as a result of the triangular trade between New England and Africa.  Slaves were brought to the Caribbean islands to work sugar plantations, producing molasses for the New England rum trade. Wood's research compares and contrasts the practice of slavery in North America, from the sugar plantations of the Caribbean, to rice production in the Carolinas, to the cotton fields that spread across the South.
            Ultimately a two-part lecture series, Wood's presentation at the upcoming CVHS meeting will focus on the earliest practice of North American slavery, the sugar plantations of the West Indies.  “CVHS is fortunate to have such a scholar as Wood on our board of directors”, says CVHS President Dr. Mac Holderfield.  “We are not only looking forward to his initial presentation, but are excited about his return to the speaker's podium the following January to discuss slavery in the context of rice and cotton production.  We have been working towards developing a special series event for our January program slate, and Murphy Wood is an excellent choice as our first speaker.”
            A native of northern Chambers County, Wood  teaches AP History at his alma mater, Springwood School in Lanett. Wood's students recently partnered with the Cobb Archives in an oral history project.  He also uses his talents as a Civil War re-enactor to create school-wide learning opportunities. Last summer he was chosen to be part of a select review committee, made up of high school history teachers from across America, to grade the essay portion of the AP History Exam.        Before returning to his roots, he lived and worked in Virginia, where he received a master’s degree in Early American History from James Madison University.  He has appeared as guest speaker and has presented research papers at numerous Civil War conferences and lecture series in Virginia and Kentucky.  In addition, he has served as tour guide for several Civil War motor coach tours of the Shenandoah Valley and as a private guide for a variety of tour groups.
              The Bradshaw Library is located on Highway 29 in Valley, Alabama, approximately one mile south of I-85 Exit 79.  The public is invited and encouraged to attend.

Sunday, September 22, 2013

CVHS Program for Sunday, October 20, 2013, at 3 p.m.

SCHOOL SPIRITS: GHOST STORIES FROM ALABAMA'S COLLEGE CAMPUSES
 
         Football season notwithstanding, “school spirit” will take on a whole different meaning at the upcoming meeting of the Chattahoochee Valley Historical Society.
The CVHS will hold its fall quarterly meeting on October 20, at the Bradshaw Library in Valley, Alabama, beginning at 3:00 pm ET.  Featured speaker Dr. Alan Brown will lecture on “School Spirits: Ghost Stories from Alabama’s College Campuses”, a Roads Scholars’ presentation sponsored by the Alabama Humanities Foundation.
            During his presentation, Brown will discuss the signature ghost stories from many of Alabama’s colleges and universities, including Auburn, University of Alabama, and Montevallo.  According to Brown, most of his stories were told to him by students and professors from the state’s institutions of higher learning.
            A professor at the University of West Alabama, Brown has published and lectured extensively in the field of American Literature.  For the past few years, his interest in Southern folklore has manifested itself in several collections of Southern ghost stories.  His 1996 book, The Face in the Window and Other Alabama Ghostlore, was the first in a series of more than a dozen related publications, including Haunted Georgia and Haunted Vicksburg.
Brown’s association with the Alabama Humanities Foundation spans two decades.  He has spoken to groups throughout the state on a wide variety of folklore topics.  He has also been awarded multiple research grants and led several teaching seminars for AHF as well.
            In addition, Brown has professional ties with the Alabama Writer’s Symposium, the Alabama State Council of the Arts, The Alabama Historical Society, the Alabama Folk Life Society, and the Popular Culture Association of the American South.
            “Our Historical Society seeks to offer the public a diverse range of historical topics, including Southern folklore. With football fever rising and the Halloween season approaching, Dr. Brown’s presentation should appeal to a wide audience,” says CVHS program chair Malinda Powers.
As always, the public is invited to attend and there is no charge.  The Bradshaw Library is located on Highway 29 in Valley, Alabama, approximately one mile south of I-85 Exit 79.  For additional information on the historical society, including membership and donation opportunities, visit the organization’s website at www.cvhistoricalsociety.org. 
             


Saturday, March 16, 2013

CVHS Program for Sunday, April 21, 2013, at 3 p.m.



THE CIVIL WAR SOLDIER
            
Due to extenuating circumstances, the program originally planned for the upcoming meeting of the Chattahoochee Valley Historical Society has been changed.  On April 21, at 3:00 pm EDT, Civil War historian, educator and re-enactor Murphy Wood will present “Life of the Civil War Soldier”.  His presentation will examine the culture, motivation, weapons, training and combat experience of the Civil War soldier.

A native of northern Chambers County, Wood now teaches AP History at his alma mater, Springwood School in Lanett.  Before returning to his roots, he lived and worked in Virginia, where he received a master’s degree in Early American History from James Madison University.  He has appeared as guest speaker and has presented research papers at numerous Civil War conferences and lecture series in Virginia and Kentucky.  In addition, he has served as tour guide for several Civil War motor coach tours of the Shenandoah Valley and as a private guide for a variety of tour groups.

“We were delighted when Wood joined our Board of Directors recently.  We are looking forward to a very interesting program, and encourage all members and others in the community who are interested in the Civil War to attend our spring quarterly meeting this Sunday,” says Dr. Horace Holderfield, President of the CVHS.   The Bradshaw Library is located on Highway 29 in Valley, Alabama, approximately one mile south of I-85 Exit 79.  

Monday, January 7, 2013

CVHS Program for Sunday, January 20, 2013, at 3 p.m.



CVHS Program to Examine Regional Archaeology Project


The Chattahoochee Valley Historical Society will hold its winter quarterly meeting on January 20, at the Bradshaw Library in Valley, Alabama, at 3:00 pm ET.  The program will feature an exciting archaeological project currently underway in Macon County, Alabama. Executive Director Shari Williams and Managing Director Glenn Drummond will discuss the mission and scope of “The Ridge”, a project taking its name from the topography of southeast Macon County.  At the core of this project is an archaeological dig site, which offers a unique opportunity for the general public to participate in pre-scheduled digs under the guidance and supervision of experts.  An interpretative center at the site provides students, historians, and tourists a glimpse of the storied past of this region.  Artifacts date from the Archaic Period of Native American culture.  Relics from the antebellum period through the 20th century have also been discovered here.

Rural communities of Boromville, Creek Stand, and Warrior Stand are situated on “The Ridge” near the Alabama/Georgia border along the path of the historic Federal Road.  Built in the early 1800’s, the Federal Road began as a pre-historic Native American footpath that followed a topographical ridge line separating the drainage basins of the Chattahoochee and Tallapoosa rivers.

The importance of this area as a gateway to the western frontier and its rich multi-cultural heritage motivated Williams, Drummond and a nucleus of dedicated volunteers to develop this project.  In the fall of 2011, they received a small grant from the Alabama Historical Commission to fund start-up activities. Their mission is to collect, display and interpret artifacts, records and oral history of the region in order to educate residents and visitors about the contributions of The Ridge to the nation’s history.  After opening the interpretive center in May 2012, the project secured Alabama non-profit organization status.  Students ranging from elementary age to college level have visited the Ridge participating in field digs and getting genuine hands-on experience in the study of archaeology. 

“The Ridge Archaeology Project is a great example of historic preservation at the grassroots level.  It’s amazing what can be accomplished when a community comes together and its citizens are willing to work towards preserving their heritage,” says CVHS program chair Malinda Powers.

As always, the public is invited to attend and there is no charge.  The Bradshaw Library is located on Highway 29 in Valley, Alabama, approximately one mile south of I-85 Exit 79.  For additional information on the historical society, including membership and donation opportunities, visit the organization’s website at www.cvhistoricalsociety.org. 

             
 

Monday, October 15, 2012

CVHS Program for Sunday, October 21, 2012 at 3 p.m.



CVHS Program to Highlight Mill Village Life
         
            The Chattahoochee Valley Historical Society will hold its fall quarterly meeting on October 21, at the Bradshaw Library in Valley, Alabama, begining at 3:00 pm ET.  Featured speaker Rhonda Baldwin of Randolph County will present “Life and Labor on the Handley Lowell Mill Village: 1901 – 1972.”  In her power-point presentation, Baldwin uses historical photographs, music, poetry and stories to recapture the unique character that once defined the Alabama mill village.  

            What began as a Master’s thesis while earning her graduate degree in History at Jacksonville State University, her research of more than one hundred interviews provided a springboard for her book, “Small Things Forgotten”, with sales in excess of 300 copies to date.  Baldwin explains, “I chose that title because the workers being interviewed always said, ‘I don’t know anything you’d want to write about’.  I would respond that it is the small things that make a good story.  Then, they began pouring out their stories with a gleam in their eyes and, sometimes, tears.  I sat on many front porches in the hot summer heat of Randolph County and came to love these people and appreciate their contribution to our community, which is sometimes overlooked.”

            Baldwin will examine the dramatic changes that factory workers encountered as they left their farmsteads and moved to the mill village seeking work, as well as the creative ways in which they coped with their challenges.  Photographs abound in her power-point presentation, a historical collage of the many facets of life in the Lowell Mill village.

             CVHS President Mac Holderfield believes Baldwin’s topic will resonate with the Valley audience.  “Ms. Baldwin has a passion for local history, and most especially, for the mill workers of Lowell Mill Village.  Our shared textile heritage makes this a program that Valley folks are sure to enjoy. History buffs will appreciate the descriptive first-hand accounts from which Ms. Baldwin based her research.”

            A graduate of Handley High School, Baldwin now teaches history at her alma mater.  She and her husband live in Wadley, Alabama, where they raise cows and corn.  A member of the Randolph County Historical Museum and the Chattahoochee Valley Historical Society, Baldwin recently delivered a lecture based upon her book to the Alabama Historical Association.

Following the presentation, those attending will have an opportunity to purchase a signed copy of “Small Things Forgotten” for $20.00.

As always, the public is invited to attend and there is no charge.  The Bradshaw Library is located on Highway 29 in Valley, Alabama, approximately one mile south of I-85 Exit 79.  For additional information on the historical society, including membership and donation opportunities, visit the organization’s website at www.cvhistoricalsociety.org.